Affiliate Faculty


Samuel AmagoTintype-Sam-Amago-01

Professor of Spanish

Samuel Amago teaches courses on modern and contemporary Spanish literary history, cinema, comics, and culture in the Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese. He is the author of Spanish Cinema in the Global Context: Film on Film (Routledge, 2013) and True Lies: Narrative Self-Consciousness in the Contemporary Spanish Novel (Bucknell UP, 2006). His research currently centers on waste and urban space in post-dictatorship Spain.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


Jonathan CannonCannon-Photo_0901-17.jpg

Blaine T. Philips Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law

Jonathan Cannon is the Blaine T. Phillips Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he also serves as director of the law school’s environmental and land use law program.  He joined the law school faculty in 1998 from the Environmental Protection Agency, where he served as general counsel (1995-98) and assistant administrator for administration and resources management (1992-95). Cannon teaches environmental and energy law, land use law, and conservation planning and law; his scholarly interests include place-based environmental management and the connection between culture and environmental law and policy. He is the author of Environment in the Balance: The Green Movement and the Supreme Court, published in 2015 by Harvard University Press. He is at work on a second book, Hidden Landscapes: A Memoir of Places.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


FRANK DUKESDSC07127.jpg

Lecturer & Distinguished Fellow, Institute for Environmental Negotiation

Frank Dukes, Ph.D. directed the Institute for Environmental Negotiation, University of Virginia, from 2000-2015 before stepping down to concentrate on applied work. He has facilitated numerous collaborative change processes, including discussions involving communities impacted by the 2014 Duke Energy coal ash release and ongoing work with Appalachian communities undergoing economic transition. He recently conducted a widely-shared evaluation of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. He leads IEN’s Transforming Community Spaces project helping communities come to terms with their racial histories.

He teaches the class “Collaborative Planning for Sustainability.” He was awarded the 2016 John C. Casteen III Diversity-Equity-Inclusion Award for the University of Virginia, and the 2012 Sharon M. Pickett Award for Environmental Conflict Resolution.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


DEBJANI GANGULYDG photo at desk

Professor of English and the Director of the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures.

Debjani Ganguly is Professor of English and the Director of the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures. She is the author of This Thing Called the World: The Contemporary Novel as Global Form (Duke 2016) and Caste, Colonialism and Counter-Modernity (Routledge 2005). She is currently at work on a two-volume Cambridge History of World Literature, and a monograph called Techno-Planetary Catastrophes: Form at the Limits of the HumanThe project explores the contemporary novel and its mediation of human and post-human life-forms in the era of techno-security and biogenetic capitalism, and anthropogenic climate change. Three catastrophic scenarios feature in this study: industrial/nuclear accidents, drone warfare, and devastated coastal ecologies. The larger horizon of this research lies in the emergence in recent years of a vibrant interdisciplinary discourse on how biological, technogenic and geological understandings of human beings relate to notions of political belonging and social justice.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


ANDREW W. KAHRLunnamed

Associate Professor of History and African American Studies

Andrew Kahrl’s research focuses on the social, political, and environmental history of real estate development and land ownership in 20th century coastal America.  He has written on the impact of leisure and tourism economies on coastal communities and environments. He is currently researching the politics of development and conservation in the 1970s, with a focus on legal and political contests over planned resort developments and beachfront engineering projects along the mid-Atlantic coast.  His previous works include The Land Was Ours: How Black Beaches Became White Wealth in the Coastal South (UNC Press, 2016) and Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline (Yale UP, 2018), as well as several essays and articles on real estate development, beach privatization, and African American land loss in the coastal South.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


MICHAEL A. LIVERMORELivermore

Professor of Law

Michael A. Livermore joined the law faculty at the University of Virginia in 2013. He teaches environmental law, administrative law, regulatory law and policy, and advanced seminars on these topics. His research focuses on environmental law, regulation, bureaucratic oversight, and the computational analysis of law. He frequently collaborates on interdisciplinary projects with researchers in other academic fields, including economics, computer science and neurology. Livermore is a leading expert on the use of cost-benefit analysis to evaluate environmental regulation. He was the founding director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University’s School of Law and clerked for Judge Harry T. Edwards on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. His views and commentary have appeared in The Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post, and The New York Times.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


KAREN McGLATHERYKaren_McGlathery_photo

Professor of Environmental Sciences

Karen McGlathery is a Professor of Environmental Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, Lead Investigator of the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR) Long Term Ecological Research Program (www.vcrlter.virginia.edu), and Director of UVA’s Environmental Resilience Institute (www.eri.virginia.edu). Her research focuses on coastal resilience, and how healthy coastal habitats – marshes, seagrass meadows, barrier islands – protect coastal communities from sea-level rise and storms and, at the same time, provide other benefits to society. She works closely with The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences on the world’s largest seagrass restoration project in the VCR. Her research group focuses on the role of restoration in reinstating ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration, water quality improvement, and habitat for fish, crabs, and other wildlife.  Her research collaborations also cross disciplinary boundaries, including socio-economic valuation of coastal habitats, and arts-humanities-science partnerships focused on coastal futures.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


SHANKAR NAIRShankar Nair Photo.png

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures

Shankar Nair is an historian of South Asian religions, with a research focus on Muslim-Hindu intellectual interactions in medieval and early modern India. Within the environmental humanities, he examines a broad variety of Muslim and Hindu discourses, including philosophical, theological, ethical, exegetical, mystical, literary, and artistic treatments of the natural world. He is interested in both pre-modern conceptions and cosmologies relating to the natural environment, as well as contemporary Muslim and Hindu thought concerning the environmental crisis, the environmental humanities, and sustainability.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


BRIAN P. OWENSBYunnamed (1)

Professor of History and Director, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation

Brian Owensby has written widely on Latin American history, from the colonial to the modern periods. His current project, tentatively titled Gain and Transformation in the Land without Evil. Guaraní, Settlers and Jesuits in Early-Modern Paraguay, involves an exploration of what happens when European notions of individual gain intrude upon an indigenous society organized in relation to gift-reciprocity and social mutuality. The book is simultaneously a narrative of a particular historical encounter and an inquiry into the normalization of and resistance to gain in social relations. Owensby works at the disciplinary juncture between history, anthropology, economics, philosophy, theology and theory to question normalized structures of human motivation in concrete circumstances. In addition to an appointment as full professor in history, he is director of the Center for Global Inquiry + Innovation and co-director of the Yamuna River Project in New Delhi.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


TONY PERRYTony Perry Headshot 7-2018

Assistant Professor of African-American and African Studies

Tony Perry is faculty in the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies. His research on the environmental history of slavery in the U.S. examines how the institution of slavery informed enslaved people’s relationship to the environment, how this relationship diverged from that of slaveholders, and how the heterogeneity of the enslaved community contributed to differences in said relationship among slaves. Thinking across several dimensions of the environment including the land and landscape, the aquatic, the weather, and the supernatural, Perry pays particular attention to the many ways the environment was simultaneously an empowering and antagonizing element in enslaved people’s daily lives.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


SALLY E. PUSEDEpusede

Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences

Sally Pusede is an atmospheric chemist with broad interests in air quality, atmosphere-biosphere interactions, and environmental justice. Her research group makes measurements at the Earth’s surface and from onboard aircraft in diverse locations, including polluted cities, agricultural areas, and within forest canopies. Their focus is on the role of reactive nitrogen in chemical oxidation mechanisms and emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. They utilize spatial and temporal variability in their datasets to derive mechanistic insight into processes taking place in urban and human-influenced environments. They work to find solutions to atmospheric problems that adversely affect human health and ecosystems.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


Matthew ReidenbachReidenbach_image.jpeg

Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences

Matthew Reidenbach is an associate professor within the Department of Environmental Sciences. He also holds a courtesy appointment within the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. His primary area of research is environmental fluid dynamics, with an emphasis on fluid-biological interactions in coastal environments. His studies include the effects of flow and turbulence on nutrient exchange in coral reefs, larval transport in estuaries, chemical dispersion in the coastal ocean, and wave dynamics. He also studies coastal soundscapes, and in particular the sounds found within the coastal barrier island systems along the Virginia coastline.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


CHARLOTTE ROGERSRogers headshot

Assistant Professor of Spanish

Charlotte Rogers is Assistant Professor of Spanish. Her research examines representations of the tropics in contemporary Latin American literature and culture through an ecocritical lens.  She is the author of two comparative literary monographs, Jungle Fever: Exploring Madness and Medicine in Twentieth-Century Tropical Narratives (Vanderbilt University Press, 2012) and Mourning El Dorado: Literature and Extractivism in the American Tropics (University of Virginia Press, forthcoming in 2019).  As part of the Coastal Futures Conservatory, she is working on a research project provisionally titled “Creative Resistance: The Power of the Arts in the Aftermath of Caribbean Hurricanes.”  The project focuses on how artistic endeavors respond to tropical storm devastation and how they can galvanize communities to address the ecological, social, political, and economic conditions hurricanes lay bare. “Creative Resistance” aims to reveal the essential role of the arts in the planet’s environmental futures.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


WILLIAM SHOBEunnamed

Professor of Public Policy; Director, Center for Economic and Policy Studies, Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service

Professor Shobe splits his time between the Batten School and UVa’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, where he heads up the Center for Economic and Policy Studies. He also teaches a class in environmental economics for the UVa Economics Department. His current research includes emission market and auction design, environmental federalism, improved economic modeling of Virginia’s economy, state economic development incentives, and state economic forecasting. Broadly, he is interested in environmental economics, emission market design, energy economics, climate change policy design, and incentives and institutions for environmental management.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


HERMAN H. SHUGART, JR.Shugart photo USE II jpeg.jpg

W.W. Corcoran Professor of Natural History

H.H. “Hank” Shugart is W.W. Corcoran Professor in Environmental Sciences and co-faculty in Biology.  He has been teaching ecology classes since 1971. His research and teaching interests combine: global ecology, forest ecology, conservation science and interactions between human cultures and their environment.  Hank’s co-teaching includes classes shared with faculty from the Law, Commerce and Architecture Schools as well as with colleagues in the College from History and Anthropology. Fifty-six doctoral students have graduated from his research program.  They have helped him conduct research in Australia, Russia, China, Africa and North America. Hank has written over 450 scientific publications, including three recent books on conservation and global change. He was honored to receive UVA’s inaugural “Distinguished Scientist” award.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website


 


BARBARA BROWN WILSONBarbara_Wilson_05_Cropped.jpg

Assistant Professor of Urban & Environmental Planning

Barbara Brown Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning and the Director of Inclusion and Equity at the University of Virginia School of Architecture. Her research and teaching focus on the history, theory, ethics, and practice of sustainable community design and development, and on the role of urban social movements in the built world.

📧 Contact 

🔗 Website